Farmer reported prevalence and factors associated with contagious ovine digital dermatitis in Wales: A questionnaire of 511 sheep farmers.



Angell, JW, Duncan, JS ORCID: 0000-0002-1370-3085, Carter, SD ORCID: 0000-0002-3585-9400 and Grove-White, DH ORCID: 0000-0002-5969-5535
(2014) Farmer reported prevalence and factors associated with contagious ovine digital dermatitis in Wales: A questionnaire of 511 sheep farmers. Preventive Veterinary Medicine, 113 (1). 132 - 138.

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Abstract

In 2012, 2000 questionnaires were sent to a random sample of Welsh sheep farmers. The questionnaire investigated farmers' knowledge and views on contagious ovine digital dermatitis (CODD) - an emerging disease of sheep responsible for causing severe lameness, welfare and production problems. The overall response rate was 28.3% with a usable response rate of 25.6%. The between farm prevalence of CODD was 35.0% and the median farmer estimated prevalence of CODD was 2.0%. The disease now appears endemic and widespread in Wales. Furthermore, there has been a rapid increase in reports of CODD arriving on farms since the year 2000. Risk factors for CODD identified in this study include the presence of bovine digital dermatitis (BDD) in cattle on the farm and larger flocks. Farmers also consider concurrent footrot/interdigital dermatitis, buying in sheep, adult sheep, time of year and housing to be associated with CODD. Further experimental research is necessary to establish whether these observations are true associations.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ## TULIP Type: Articles/Papers (Journal) ##
Uncontrolled Keywords: Contagious ovine digital dermatitis, Epidemiology, Infectious foot disease, Lameness, Sheep, Welfare
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 20 May 2015 09:53
Last Modified: 28 Nov 2020 09:10
DOI: 10.1016/j.prevetmed.2013.09.014
Related URLs:
URI: http://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/2011534