Country-specific case studies on fertility among the descendants of immigrants



Kulu, Hill and Hannemann, Tina
(2015) Country-specific case studies on fertility among the descendants of immigrants. [Report]

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Abstract

This report consists of six case studies on fertility among the descendants of immigrants by comparing their patterns to those of the ‘native’ population. The countries that are included in the analysis are Germany, Sweden, United Kingdom, France, Spain and Switzerland. All of the case studies use large-scale longitudinal data and apply event-history analysis. The analysis shows that the descendants of immigrants have lower first-birth rates than ‘natives’ suggesting the postponement of childbearing among ethnic minorities; the only exception are women of Turkish origin who exhibit elevated first-birth levels in several countries (Germany, Sweden, Switzerland and France) indicating early childbearing among this group. Some ethnic minority groups have somewhat higher second-birth risks than ‘natives’ (e.g. South Asians in the UK, women of Turkish origin in Germany and Moroccans in Spain), but many show significantly higher third-birth rates; elevated third-birth levels are observed among women of Turkish, Middle Eastern and Northern African origin in Sweden, South Asians in the UK and North Africans in France and Spain. Elevated third-birth levels largely explain a relatively high total fertility among these minority groups. Fertility differences between the ‘native’ and ethnic minority women largely persist once women’s educational level is included in the analysis, but decrease after factors related to language, religion and family of origin are controlled. Overall, the analysis supports the importance of cultural-normative factors, potentially related to minority subcultures, in shaping childbearing patterns of ethnic minority groups, particularly third-birth rates. The analysis also suggests that education and employment related factors may play a role, e.g. explain delayed entry into motherhood among most ethnic minorities or low fertility among highly educated women of Turkish descent in Germany.

Item Type: Report
Additional Information: Authors contributions include introduction and case study "Why does fertility remain high among certain UK-born ethnic minority women?"
Subjects: ?? H1 ??
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Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 13 Oct 2015 14:50
Last Modified: 15 Apr 2021 07:16
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URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/2030499