Perceptions towards electronic cigarettes for smoking cessation among Stop Smoking Service users



(2015) Perceptions towards electronic cigarettes for smoking cessation among Stop Smoking Service users. British Journal of Health Psychology. ISSN 1359-107X (Submitted)

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Abstract

Objectives Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are promoted as smoking cessation tools, yet they remain unavailable from Stop Smoking Services in England; the debate over their safety and efficacy is ongoing. This study was designed to explore perceptions and reasons for use or non-use of electronic cigarettes as smoking cessation tools, among individuals engaged in Stop Smoking Services. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were undertaken with twenty participants engaged in Stop Smoking Services in the Northwest of England. Participants comprised of both individuals who had tried e-cigarettes (n = 6) and those who had not (n = 14). Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were subject to thematic analysis, which explored participant beliefs and experiences of e-cigarettes. Results A thematic analysis of transcripts suggested that the following three superordinate themes were prominent: (1) self-efficacy and beliefs in e-cigarettes; (2) e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation aid; (3) cues for e-cigarette use. Participants, particularly never users, were especially concerned regarding e-cigarette efficacy and safety. Overall, participants largely expressed uncertainty regarding e-cigarette safety and efficacy, with some evidence of misunderstanding. Conclusions Evidence of uncertainty and misunderstanding regarding information on e-cigarettes highlights the importance of providing smokers with concise, up-to-date information regarding e-cigarettes, enabling smokers to make informed treatment decisions. Furthermore, identification of potential predictors of e-cigarette use can be used to inform Stop Smoking Services provision and future research.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 11 Nov 2015 09:22
Last Modified: 31 Mar 2016 12:49
URI: http://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/2036383

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