Skeletal muscle ATP synthesis and cellular H+ handling measured by localized 31P-MRS during exercise and recovery



Fiedler, GB, Schmid, AI, Goluch, S, Schewzow, K, Laistler, E, Niess, F, Unger, E, Wolzt, M, Mirzahosseini, A, Kemp, Graham J ORCID: 0000-0002-8324-9666
et al (show 2 more authors) (2016) Skeletal muscle ATP synthesis and cellular H+ handling measured by localized 31P-MRS during exercise and recovery. Scientific Reports, 6.

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Abstract

31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is widely used for non-invasive investigation of muscle metabolism dynamics. This study aims to extend knowledge on parameters derived from these measurements in detail and comprehensiveness: proton (H+) efflux, buffer capacity and the contributions of glycolytic (L) and oxidative (Q) rates to ATP synthesis were calculated from the evolutions of phosphocreatine (PCr) and pH. Data are reported for two muscles in the human calf, for each subject and over a wide range of exercise intensities. 22 subjects performed plantar flexions in a 7T MR-scanner, leading to PCr changes ranging from barely noticeable to almost complete depletion, depending on exercise protocol and muscle studied by localized MRS. Cytosolic buffer capacity was quantified for the first time non-invasively and individually, as was proton efflux evolution in early recovery. Acidification started once PCr depletion reached 60–75%. Initial and end-exercise L correlated with end-exercise levels of PCr and approximately linear with pH. Q calculated directly from PCr and pH derivatives was plausible, requiring fewer assumptions than the commonly used ADP-model. In conclusion, the evolution of parameters describing cellular energy metabolism was measured over a wide range of exercise intensities, revealing a relatively complete picture of muscle metabolism.

Item Type: Article
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 20 Sep 2016 14:08
Last Modified: 24 May 2022 19:10
DOI: 10.1038/srep32037
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3003395