The role of positive goal engagement in increased mental well-being among individuals with chronic non-cancer pain.



Iddon, Joanne E, Taylor, Peter J ORCID: 0000-0003-1407-0985, Unwin, Jen and Dickson, Joanne M ORCID: 0000-0002-4626-8761
(2019) The role of positive goal engagement in increased mental well-being among individuals with chronic non-cancer pain. Unspecified thesis, University of Liverpool.

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Abstract

Individuals with chronic pain commonly report significant functional impairment and reduced quality of life. Despite this, little is known about psychological processes and mechanisms underpinning enhancements in well-being within this population. The study aimed to investigate whether (1) increased levels of pain intensity and interference were associated with lower levels of mental well-being, (2) increased positive goal engagement was associated with higher levels of mental well-being and (3) whether the relationships between pain characteristics and mental well-being were mediated by increased positive goal engagement. A total of 586 individuals with chronic pain participated in the cross-sectional, online study. Participants completed self-report measures to assess pain intensity and interference, mental well-being and goal motivation variables. Results showed that pain interference and positive goal engagement were associated with mental well-being. Moreover, the relationship between pain interference and mental well-being was partially mediated by positive goal engagement. The results provide tentative evidence for the protective role of positive goal engagement in enabling individuals with chronic pain to maintain a sense of mental well-being. The study develops the biopsychosocial model of chronic pain by examining the roles and relationships of relevant yet previously unexplored psychological constructs. The promotion of mental well-being through the enhancement of positive goal engagement is discussed, offering a platform for further research and clinical interventions.

Item Type: Thesis (Unspecified)
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Life Sciences > Tech, Infrastructure and Environmental Directorate
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 05 Jan 2017 12:02
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2022 10:53
DOI: 10.17638/03003728
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3003728