Transience, Class and Gender in Interwar Sexual Health Policy: The Case of the Liverpool VD Scheme



Caslin, S ORCID: 0000-0001-5802-6543
(2019) Transience, Class and Gender in Interwar Sexual Health Policy: The Case of the Liverpool VD Scheme. Social History of Medicine, 32 (3). 544 - 564.

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Abstract

Focusing on the implementation of the Liverpool VD Scheme, this article reasserts the importance of morality to interwar medical understandings about the spread of venereal disease. Despite claiming to offer impartial, practical solutions to the spread of venereal disease, the Liverpool VD Scheme, created in 1916, reflected and promoted the notion that the transient lifestyles of many of the working class presented physical and moral threats to the city. This article therefore counters suggestions that the interwar control of venereal disease was shaped by practicalities rather than moralities. Evidence is provided for the persistence of a medico-moralising that continued to place working-class sexual practices at the heart of discussions about the spread of venereal disease. However, presumptions about men’s biological need for sex combined with the local importance of the port, meaning that working-class seamen with VD were judged less harshly than working-class women with the same infections.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: morality, prostitution, public health, seamen, Liverpool
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 01 Aug 2017 06:13
Last Modified: 15 May 2021 07:11
DOI: 10.1093/shm/hkx065
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3008723