Estimating the burden of medically-attended norovirus gastroenteritis: modelling linked primary care and hospitalization datasets



Verstraeten, T, Cattaert, T, Harris, JP ORCID: 0000-0001-9606-9480, Lopman, B, Tam, CC and Ferreira, G
(2017) Estimating the burden of medically-attended norovirus gastroenteritis: modelling linked primary care and hospitalization datasets. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 216 (8). 957 - 965.

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Abstract

Background Norovirus is the leading cause of community-acquired and nosocomial acute gastroenteritis. Routine testing for norovirus is seldom undertaken, and diagnosis is mainly based on presenting symptoms. This makes understanding the burden of medically attended norovirus-attributable gastroenteritis (MA-NGE) and targeting care and prevention strategies challenging. Methods We used linked population-based healthcare datasets (Clinical Practice Research Datalink General Practice OnLine Database linked with Hospital Episode Statistics Admitted Patient Care) to model the incidence of MA-NGE associated with primary care consultations or hospitalizations according to age groups in England in the period July 2007–June 2013. Results Mean annual incidence rates of MA-NGE were 4.9/1000 person-years and 0.7/1000 person-years for episodes involving primary care or hospitalizations, respectively. Incidence rates were highest in children aged <5 years: 34.0 consultations/1000 person-years and 3.3 hospitalizations/1000 person-years. Medically attended norovirus-attributable gastroenteritis hospitalization rates were second highest in adults aged >65 years (1.7/1000 person-years). Conclusions In this particular study, the burden of MA-NGE estimated from healthcare datasets was higher than previously estimated in small cohort studies in England. Routinely collected primary care and hospitalization datasets are useful resources to estimate and monitor the burden of MA-NGE in a population over time.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: child, gastroenteritis, norovirus, primary health care, norwalk viral gastroenteritis, datasets
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 01 Aug 2017 06:32
Last Modified: 17 Nov 2021 16:10
DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jix410
Open Access URL: https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jix410
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URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3008735