Impact of low-dose CT screening on smoking cessation among high-risk participants in the UK Lung Cancer Screening Trial



Brain, Kate, Carter, Ben, Lifford, Kate J, Burke, Olivia, Devaraj, Anand, Baldwin, David R, Duffy, Stephen and Field, John K ORCID: 0000-0003-3951-6365
(2017) Impact of low-dose CT screening on smoking cessation among high-risk participants in the UK Lung Cancer Screening Trial. THORAX, 72 (10). 912 - 918.

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Abstract

Background Smoking cessation was examined among high-risk participants in the UK Lung Cancer Screening (UKLS) Pilot Trial of low-dose CT screening. Methods High-risk individuals aged 50–75 years who completed baseline questionnaires were randomised to CT screening (intervention) or usual care (no screening control). Smoking habit was determined at baseline using self-report. Smokers were asked whether they had quit smoking since joining UKLS at T1 (2 weeks after baseline scan results or control assignment) and T2 (up to 2 years after recruitment). Intention-to-treat (ITT) regression analyses were undertaken, adjusting for baseline lung cancer distress, trial site and sociodemographic variables. Results Of a total 4055 individuals randomised to CT screening or control, 1546 were baseline smokers (759 intervention, 787 control). Smoking cessation rates were 8% (control n=36/479) versus 14% (intervention n=75/527) at T1 and 21% (control n=79/377) versus 24% (intervention n=115/488) at T2. ITT analyses indicated that the odds of quitting among screened participants were significantly higher at T1 (adjusted OR (aOR) 2.38, 95% CI 1.56 to 3.64, p<0.001) and T2 (aOR 1.60, 95% CI 1.17 to 2.18, p=0.003) compared with control. Intervention participants who needed additional clinical investigation were more likely to quit in the longer term compared with the control group (aOR 2.29, 95% CI 1.62 to 3.22, p=0.007) and those receiving a negative result (aOR 2.43, 95% CI 1.54 to 3.84, p<0.001). Conclusions CT lung cancer screening for high-risk participants presents a teachable moment for smoking cessation, especially among those who receive a positive scan result. Further behavioural research is needed to evaluate optimal strategies for integrating smoking cessation intervention with stratified lung cancer screening.

Item Type: Article
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 02 Aug 2017 13:20
Last Modified: 19 Feb 2021 12:00
DOI: 10.1136/thoraxjnl-2016-209690
Open Access URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28710339
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URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3008783