The use of self-directed, group project work for teaching technical aspects of radiotherapy equipment to undergraduate therapeutic radiography students



Calder, KA and Kirby, MC ORCID: 0000-0001-9765-5641
(2016) The use of self-directed, group project work for teaching technical aspects of radiotherapy equipment to undergraduate therapeutic radiography students. [Poster]

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Abstract

Aims/Objectives: To demonstrate enhancement of student learning and engagement through successful use of group project work for technical aspects of radiotherapy equipment. Content of Presentation: Group project work forms a key element of teaching methods for our radiotherapy equipment module; in resonance with our philosophy of combining academic depth with relevant clinical practice. The cohort is divided into groups to research a relevant key subject area. In the academic setting, groups analyse the problem using PBL and mind mapping methods; strategizing and directing information collation, especially during clinical placement. When completed, the final group work is presented to class and edited by the lecturer prior to revision for the unseen written exam. Relevance/Impact: Learning and teaching with group project work is vital to developing deep learning experiences, tying together clinical scenarios with academic depth; a must for therapeutic radiographers in clinical practice. Outcomes: Originally groups were chosen randomly throughout the cohort, now students at each clinical site research a particular topic – this has improved the evaluations having no negative comments regarding the group dynamics/ work. The technical focus has also changed to align with the oncology module studied concurrently, again resulting in positive comments. Marks achieved show a steady rise in maximum and mean marks for the group work. Discussion: Developments have resulted in positive changes in results and evaluations; reduction of adverse comments through a continued philosophy of change and refinement to teaching strategies and maintenance of clinical focus on what is technically and content-wise a difficult and voluminous module.

Item Type: Poster
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 08 Aug 2017 06:47
Last Modified: 16 Mar 2020 09:34
URI: http://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3008860