Recent advances in pathophysiology of disseminated intravascular coagulation: the role of circulating histones and neutrophil extracellular traps.



Alhamdi, Yasir ORCID: 0000-0002-0133-5756 and Toh, Cheng-Hock
(2017) Recent advances in pathophysiology of disseminated intravascular coagulation: the role of circulating histones and neutrophil extracellular traps. F1000Research, 6. 2143 - ?.

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Abstract

Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired condition that develops as a complication of systemic and sustained cell injury in conditions such as sepsis and trauma. It represents major dysregulation and increased thrombin generation in vivo. A poor understanding and recognition of the complex interactions in the coagulation, fibrinolytic, inflammatory, and innate immune pathways have resulted in continued poor management and high mortality rates in DIC. This review focuses attention on significant recent advances in our understanding of DIC pathophysiology. In particular, circulating histones and neutrophil extracellular traps fulfil established criteria in DIC pathogenesis. Both are damaging to the vasculature and highly relevant to the cross talk between coagulation and inflammation processes, which can culminate in adverse clinical outcomes. These molecules have a strong potential to be novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets in DIC, which is still considered synonymous with 'death is coming'.

Item Type: Article
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2018 15:21
Last Modified: 05 Aug 2022 02:11
DOI: 10.12688/f1000research.12498.1
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3017573