Socioeconomic Deprivation and the Burden of Head and Neck Cancer- Regional variations of Incidence and Mortality in Merseyside and Cheshire, North West, England



Taib, BG, Oakley, J, Dailey, Y, Hodge, I, Wright, P, du Plessis, R, Rylands, J, Taylor-Robinson, D ORCID: 0000-0002-5828-7724, Povall, S ORCID: 0000-0001-5188-2953, Schache, A ORCID: 0000-0001-9466-6038
et al (show 3 more authors) (2018) Socioeconomic Deprivation and the Burden of Head and Neck Cancer- Regional variations of Incidence and Mortality in Merseyside and Cheshire, North West, England. Clinical Otolaryngology, 43 (3). 846 - 853.

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Abstract

Objectives The aim of this longitudinal study was to examine the distribution of head and neck cancer (HANC) disease burden across the region comparing it to national trends. Design We undertook a retrospective study of routine data combining it with indicators of deprivation and lifestyle at small geographical areas within the 9 Local Authorities (LAs) of Merseyside and Cheshire Network (MCCN) for head and neck cancers. Data from the North West of England and England were used as comparator regions. Setting This research was undertaken by the Cheshire and Merseyside Public Health Collaborative, UK. Participants The Merseyside and Cheshire region serves a population of 2.2 million. Routine data allowed us to identify HANC patients diagnosed with cancers coded ICD C00‐C14 and C30‐C32 within 3 cohorts 1998‐2000, 2008‐2010 and 2009‐2011 for our analysis. Main Outcome Measures Directly age‐standardised incidence rates and directly age‐standardised mortality rates in the LAs and comparator regions were measured. Lifestyle and deprivation indicators were plotted against them and measured by Pearson's correlation coefficients. Results The incidence of head and neck cancer has increased across the region from 1998‐2000 to 2008‐2010 with a peak incidence for Liverpool males at 35/100 000 population. Certain Middle Super Output Areas contribute disproportionately to the significant effect of incidence and mortality within LAs. Income deprivation had the strongest correlation with incidence (r = .59) and mortality (r = .53) of head and neck cancer. Conclusion Our study emphasises notable geographical variations within the region which need to be addressed through public health measures.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: alcohol, deprivation, head and neck cancer, incidence, lower super output area, lifestyle, mortality, middle super output area, smoking, socioeconomic deprivation, socioeconomic status
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 10 Apr 2018 06:16
Last Modified: 20 May 2021 11:34
DOI: 10.1111/coa.13067
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3019965