Ongoing initiatives to improve the use of antibiotics in Botswana: University of Botswana symposium meeting report.



Tiroyakgosi, Celda, Matome, Matshediso, Summers, Emily, Mashalla, Yohana, Paramadhas, Bene Anand, Souda, Sajini, Malone, Brighid, Sinkala, Fatima, Kgatlwane, Joyce, Godman, Brian ORCID: 0000-0001-6539-6972
et al (show 2 more authors) (2018) Ongoing initiatives to improve the use of antibiotics in Botswana: University of Botswana symposium meeting report. Expert review of anti-infective therapy, 16 (5). pp. 381-384.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:There are ongoing initiatives in Botswana to enhance appropriate antibiotic use. The objective of this meeting was to discuss ongoing initiatives in Botswana since February 2016 to improve antibiotic use. Subsequently, use the findings to refine national and local action plans. METHOD:Presentation and review of ongoing initiatives. RESULTS:There was a high rate of antibiotic prescribing among ambulatory care patients in the public sector (42.7%) as well as for patients with upper respiratory tract infections in the private sector (72.9%). Prophylactic antibiotics were given to 73.3% of surgical patients to reduce surgical site infections (SSIs) in a leading tertiary hospital in Botswana; however, SSIs at 9% of patients can be reduced further with better timing of antibiotic prophylaxis. To date, 711 patients have been enrolled into the national point prevalence study. Highlighted concerns included limited ordering and use of sensitivity tests despite functional laboratories, as well as concerns with missed doses of antibiotics across most hospitals. CONCLUSION:A number of issues and concerns regarding antibiotic use were highlighted. Activities are ongoing across sectors to address identified concerns.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Humans, Respiratory Tract Infections, Surgical Wound Infection, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Antibiotic Prophylaxis, Ambulatory Care, Private Sector, Public Sector, Botswana, Inappropriate Prescribing, Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 27 Apr 2018 10:56
Last Modified: 19 Jan 2023 06:35
DOI: 10.1080/14787210.2018.1467756
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3020669