Academic Standards or Academic Imperialism? Zimbabwean perceptions of hegemonic power in the global construction of knowledge



Jeater, D ORCID: 0000-0002-5303-5800
(2018) Academic Standards or Academic Imperialism? Zimbabwean perceptions of hegemonic power in the global construction of knowledge. African Studies Review: the journal of the African Studies Association, 61 (2). 8 - 27.

[img] Text
Jeater_ASR_final.docx - Accepted Version

Download (71kB)

Abstract

University cultures in the global north generate powerful definitions of what constitutes ‘knowledge’ and ‘good research’. When we ask who gets to represent the ‘African perspective’, we find it is decreasingly an African. This paper argues that resource inequalities alone cannot explain this exclusion of African scholarship. Hegemonic academic standards undervalue the more positivist research orientation found in southern African universities. The struggle is not over the validity of that orientation, but over who has the power to validate it. This analysis is based upon interviews with senior university research managers in Zimbabwe and on a public roundtable on Structural Inequalities in Global Academic Publishing.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: academic publishing, Zimbabwe, hegemony, decolonizing the academy, constructions of knowledge
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 27 Jun 2018 06:21
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2021 02:10
DOI: 10.1017/asr.2017.132
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3023068