Cerebral blood flow and cognitive functioning in a community-based, multi-ethnic cohort: The SABRE study



Leeuwis, AE, Smith, LA, Melbourne, A, Hughes, AD ORCID: 0000-0001-5432-5271, Richards, M, Prins, ND, Sokolska, M, Atkinson, D, Tillin, T, Jäger, HR
et al (show 3 more authors) (2018) Cerebral blood flow and cognitive functioning in a community-based, multi-ethnic cohort: The SABRE study. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 10 (SEP).

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Abstract

© 2018 Leeuwis, Smith, Melbourne, Hughes, Richards, Prins, Sokolska, Atkinson, Tillin, Jäger, Chaturvedi, Flier and Barkhof. Introduction: Lower cerebral blood flow (CBF) is associated with cardiovascular disease and vascular risk factors, and is increasingly acknowledged as an important contributor to cognitive decline and dementia. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the association between CBF and cognitive functioning in a community-based, multiethnic cohort. Methods: From the SABRE (Southall and Brent Revisited) study, we included 214 European, 151 South Asian and 87 African Caribbean participants (71 ± 5 years; 39%F). We used 3T pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling to estimate whole-brain, hematocrit corrected CBF. We measured global cognition and three cognitive domains (memory, executive functioning/attention and language) with a neuropsychological test battery. Associations were investigated using linear regression analyses, adjusted for demographic variables, vascular risk factors and MRI measures. Results: Across groups, we found an association between higher CBF and better performance on executive functioning/attention (standardized ß [stß] = 0.11, p < 0.05). Stratification for ethnicity showed associations between higher CBF and better performance on memory and executive functioning/attention in the white European group (stß = 0.14; p < 0.05 and stß = 0.18; p < 0.01 respectively), associations were weaker in the South Asian and African Caribbean groups. Conclusions: In a multi-ethnic community-based cohort we showed modest associations between CBF and cognitive functioning. In particular, we found an association between higher CBF and better performance on executive functioning/attention and memory in the white European group. The observations are consistent with the proposed role of cerebral hemodynamics in cognitive decline.

Item Type: Article
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 08 Feb 2019 16:01
Last Modified: 19 May 2022 12:27
DOI: 10.3389/fnagi.2018.00279
Open Access URL: https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2018.00279
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3032542