Aetiology of diarrhoea among hospitalised children in Blantyre, Malawi following rotavirus vaccine introduction: a case-control study



Iturriza-Gomara, miren ORCID: 0000-0001-5816-6423, Jere, KC ORCID: 0000-0003-3376-8529, Hungerford, DJ ORCID: 0000-0002-9770-0163, Bar-Zeev, NH ORCID: 0000-0003-0570-4624, Shioda, Kayoko, Kanjerwa, Oscar, Houpt, Eric, Operario, Darwin J, Wachepa, Richard, Pollock, Louisa
et al (show 3 more authors) (2019) Aetiology of diarrhoea among hospitalised children in Blantyre, Malawi following rotavirus vaccine introduction: a case-control study. Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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Abstract

Despite rotavirus vaccination, diarrhoea remains a leading cause of child mortality. We collected stool from 684 children <5 years of age hospitalised with diarrhoea (cases) and 527 asymptomatic community controls, for four years post rotavirus vaccine introduction in Malawi, and examined for 29 pathogens using PCR. Three or more pathogens were detected in 71% of cases and 48% of controls. Pathogens significantly associated with diarrhoea (cases/controls) included rotavirus (34.7%/1.5%), enteric adenovirus (29.1%/2.7%), Cryptosporidium (27.8%/8.2%), heat-stable enterotoxin-producing E.coli (21.2%/8.5%), typical enteropathogenic E.coli (18.0%/8.3%), and Shigella/enteroinvasive E.coli (15.8%/5.7%). Additional interventions are required to prevent diarrhoea due to rotavirus and other leading pathogens.

Item Type: Article
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 05 Mar 2019 09:13
Last Modified: 22 Feb 2020 09:58
Open Access URL: https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiz084
URI: http://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3033627