The Volta River Project: planning, housing and resettlement in Ghana, 1950-1965



Jackson, Lain ORCID: 0000-0003-3481-6895, Uduku, Ola ORCID: 0000-0001-5005-2587, Addo, Irene Appeaning and Opong, Rexford Assasie
(2019) The Volta River Project: planning, housing and resettlement in Ghana, 1950-1965. JOURNAL OF ARCHITECTURE, 24 (4). pp. 512-548.

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Abstract

This paper investigates the housing schemes proposed in connection with the Volta River Project, Ghana, in the mid-1950s to early 1960s. The Volta River Project formed part of Kwame Nkrumah’s vision for Ghana’s modernisation and industrialisation in the wake of political independence. Three associated worker housing schemes demonstrated somewhat contradictory design and construction methods, from high specification, extensive amenities, and comprehensive servicing, through to self-build ‘core’ houses amounting to little more than single-room dwellings. The paper traces the complex and controversial history of these schemes, supplemented with findings of several field trips to the settlements in question, to unravel the value of the ‘Core Houses’ approach. The most successful project to incorporate indigenous agency and true collaboration was the semi-formal ‘Combined Area’ housing at Akosombo, a positive model for shared agency and collaboration in planning, housing, and facilities delivery. Sitting alongside the carefully manicured plan of Akosombo, with its regulated market, excellent health care and desire to set high standards of cleanliness, the Combined Area has not only provided homes for the lower-paid and labouring workers of the town, but has developed over time into a settlement where professionals and retired government workers are also now residing, not out of necessity but by choice. By actively developing their own homes, shared spaces and amenities there has developed a strong sense of ownership, community, and identity. The success and level of attachment to this settlement clearly extends beyond its material presence and through the shared experience of helping to cultivate a place of one’s own.

Item Type: Article
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 25 Mar 2019 14:04
Last Modified: 19 Jan 2023 00:56
DOI: 10.1080/13602365.2019.1643389
Open Access URL: https://doi.org/10.1080/13602365.2019.1643389
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URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3034876