Exploring clusters of defense styles, psychiatric symptoms and academic achievements among medical students: a cross-sectional study in Pakistan.



Waqas, Ahmed, Naveed, Sadiq, Aedma, Kapil Kiran ORCID: 0000-0002-0272-3021, Tariq, Maryam and Afzaal, Tayyaba
(2018) Exploring clusters of defense styles, psychiatric symptoms and academic achievements among medical students: a cross-sectional study in Pakistan. BMC research notes, 11 (1). 782 - ?.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE:The clusters of participants with a homogeneous psychological make-up can be identified using sophisticated machine learning techniques such as the two-step clustering algorithm. It can also help us to identify the synergistic and additive effects of a range of psychometric variables. The identification of synergistic effect of this clustering of defense mechanism has significant practical implications as they share a certain variance. This study aims to identify the clusters of ego defenses and their relationship with academic performance and mental health outcome in medical students. RESULTS:The high achievers scored higher on mature and neurotic defense styles and lower on immature than their counter parts. A higher proportion of medical students in high achievers group had normal scores on depressive symptoms than low achievers. While a majority among low achievers suffered from severe anxiety levels than high achievers group. High achievers scored higher on sublimation, humor, anticipation, suppression, pseudo-altruism, idealization, reaction formation, autistic fantasy, denial, and rationalization.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Humans, Cross-Sectional Studies, Depression, Defense Mechanisms, Anxiety, Students, Medical, Adult, Pakistan, Female, Male, Young Adult, Academic Success
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 05 Apr 2019 10:18
Last Modified: 01 Dec 2020 08:12
DOI: 10.1186/s13104-018-3876-6
Open Access URL: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13104-018-3876-6
URI: http://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3035908