Late Pleistocene human genome suggests a local origin for the first farmers of central Anatolia



Feldman, Michal, Fernandez-Dominguez, Eva, Reynolds, Luke, Baird, Douglas ORCID: 0000-0001-8651-5272, Pearson, Jessica ORCID: 0000-0001-6503-1041, Hershkovitz, Israel, May, Hila, Goring-Morris, Nigel, Benz, Marion, Gresky, Julia
et al (show 8 more authors) (2019) Late Pleistocene human genome suggests a local origin for the first farmers of central Anatolia. Nature Communications, 10 (1).

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Abstract

Anatolia was home to some of the earliest farming communities. It has been long debated whether a migration of farming groups introduced agriculture to central Anatolia. Here, we report the first genome-wide data from a 15,000-year-old Anatolian hunter-gatherer and from seven Anatolian and Levantine early farmers. We find high genetic continuity (~80–90%) between the hunter-gatherers and early farmers of Anatolia and detect two distinct incoming ancestries: an early Iranian/Caucasus related one and a later one linked to the ancient Levant. Finally, we observe a genetic link between southern Europe and the Near East predating 15,000 years ago. Our results suggest a limited role of human migration in the emergence of agriculture in central Anatolia.

Item Type: Article
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 30 Apr 2019 08:03
Last Modified: 06 Oct 2022 05:35
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-09209-7
Open Access URL: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-09209-7
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3039001