Comparison of the effects of different kibble shape on voluntary food intake and palatability of weight loss diets in pet dogs



Sagols, Emmanuelle, Hours, Marie Anne, Daniel, Ingrid, Feugier, Alexander, Flanagan, John and German, AJ ORCID: 0000-0002-3017-7988
(2019) Comparison of the effects of different kibble shape on voluntary food intake and palatability of weight loss diets in pet dogs. Research in Veterinary Science, 124. 375 - 382.

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Abstract

Altering characteristics of a dry proprietary diet can increase chewing, slow ingestion speed and reduce voluntary food intake. Panels of healthy research dogs consumed kibbled weight loss diets with either a l round (pastille) or a cross shape. Two panels (‘small-size’ panel, dogs<10 kg ‘all-size’ panel, dogs with a range of sizes) were used to determine palatability (study 1), whilst a third panel (‘consumption kinetics panel’) was used to determine voluntary food intake [VFI] and meal duration (study 2). Study 3 was a field trial where the cross kibble was fed to client-owned overweight dogs undergoing controlled weight loss, and attitudes of owners were sort. In study 1, dogs in the all-size panel consumed more of the cross-kibble diet than of the round-kibble diet (P < .001), but there was no significant difference in dogs of the small-size panel (P = 1.000). In study 2, VFI was broadly similar for both diets, with no difference in total consumption across all four meals (P = .370). However, meal duration was significantly longer for the cross kibble (meal 1: 292 s; meal 2: 650 s) compared with the round kibble (meal 1: 186 s; meal 2: 282, P < .001 for both). In study 3, owners observed more chewing behaviour (P = .031), slower ingestion speed (P = .031), and a significant decrease in food-seeking behaviour (P = .020) when eating the cross-kibble compared with the round-kibble. Altering the kibble shape of a canine therapeutic weight loss diet can decrease ingestion speed without affecting palatability, but studies are now required to determine the effect on outcomes of weight management.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: obesity, canine, appetite, weight management
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 08 May 2019 08:19
Last Modified: 30 Mar 2021 22:10
DOI: 10.1016/j.rvsc.2019.04.023
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3040121