The impact of New Labour's English health inequalities strategy on geographical inequalities in infant mortality: A time-trend analysis



Robinson, T, Brown, H, Norman, PD, Fraser, LK, Barr, B ORCID: 0000-0002-4208-9475 and Bambra, C
(2019) The impact of New Labour's English health inequalities strategy on geographical inequalities in infant mortality: A time-trend analysis. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 73 (6). 564 - 568.

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Abstract

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. Background: The English health inequalities strategy (1999-2010) aimed to reduce health inequalities between the most deprived local authorities and the rest of England. The multifaceted strategy included increased investment in healthcare, the early years, education and neighbourhood renewal. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the strategy was associated with a reduction in geographical inequalities in the infant mortality rate (IMR). Methods: We used segmented regression analysis to measure inequalities in the IMR between the most deprived local authorities and the rest of England before, during and after the health inequalities strategy period. Results: Before the strategy was implemented (1983-1998), absolute inequalities in the IMR increased between the most deprived local authorities and the rest of England at a rate of 0.034 annually (95% CI 0.001 to 0.067). Once the strategy had been implemented (1999-2010), absolute inequalities decreased at a rate of - '0.116 annually (95% CI - '0.178 to - '0.053). After the strategy period ended (2011-2017), absolute inequalities increased at a rate of 0.042 annually (95% CI - '0.042 to 0.125). Relative inequalities also marginally decreased during the strategy period. Conclusion: The English health inequalities strategy period was associated with a decline in geographical inequalities in the IMR. This research adds to the evidence base suggesting that the English health inequalities strategy was at least partially effective in reducing health inequalities, and that current austerity policies may undermine these gains.

Item Type: Article
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 07 Oct 2020 13:55
Last Modified: 05 Sep 2022 17:10
DOI: 10.1136/jech-2018-211679
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3042764