Genetic manipulation allows in vivo tracking of the life cycle of the son-killer symbiont, Arsenophonus nasoniae, and reveals patterns of host invasion, tropism and pathology



Nadal-Jimenez, Pol ORCID: 0000-0002-9883-0920, Griffin, Joanne S ORCID: 0000-0002-6401-7544, Davies, Lianne, Frost, Crystal L ORCID: 0000-0002-4370-8741, Marcello, Marco ORCID: 0000-0002-2392-8640 and Hurst, Gregory DD ORCID: 0000-0002-7163-7784
(2019) Genetic manipulation allows in vivo tracking of the life cycle of the son-killer symbiont, Arsenophonus nasoniae, and reveals patterns of host invasion, tropism and pathology. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 21 (8). 3172 - 3182.

Access the full-text of this item by clicking on the Open Access link.

Abstract

Maternally heritable symbionts are common in arthropods and represent important partners and antagonists. A major impediment to understanding the mechanistic basis of these symbioses has been lack of genetic manipulation tools, for instance, those enabling transgenic GFP expression systems for in vivo visualization. Here, we transform the ‘son‐killer’ reproductive parasite Arsenophonus nasoniae that infects the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis with the plasmid pOM1‐gfp, re‐introduce this strain to N. vitripennis and then used this system to track symbiont life history in vivo. These data revealed transfer of the symbiont into the fly pupa by N. vitripennis during oviposition and N. vitripennis larvae developing infection over time through feeding. A strong tropism of A. nasoniae to the N. vitripennis ovipositor developed during wasp pupation, which aids onward transmission. The symbiont was also visualized in diapause larvae. Occasional necrotic diapause larvae were observed which displayed intense systemic infection alongside widespread melanotic nodules indicative of an active but failed immune response. Our results provide the foundation for the study of this symbiosis through in vivo tracking of the fate of symbionts through host development, which is rarely achieved in heritable microbe/insect interactions.

Item Type: Article
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 05 Jul 2019 09:03
Last Modified: 05 Oct 2022 22:58
DOI: 10.1111/1462-2920.14724
Open Access URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.14724
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3048586