Dynamic Interface Modelling and Simulation. Part 1: Preparation and Analysis for High-Fidelity Helicopter-Ship Flight Simulations



Watson, neale ORCID: 0000-0003-0316-8266, Memon, W ORCID: 0000-0002-9550-0440, White, MD ORCID: 0000-0002-8611-9525 and Owen, ieuan ORCID: 0000-0001-5642-736X
(2019) Dynamic Interface Modelling and Simulation. Part 1: Preparation and Analysis for High-Fidelity Helicopter-Ship Flight Simulations. In: 8th Asian/Australian Rotorcraft Forum (ARF), 2019-10-30 - 2019-11-02, Ankara, Turkey.

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Abstract

Maritime helicopters are routinely deployed with modern combat ships. The recovery and launch of helicopters to and from ships at sea is regarded as one of the most demanding and dangerous environments in which a pilot may operate [1]. The ship’s motion, combined with the air flow moving over and around the ship’s superstructure, known as the ship’s airwake, contribute to overall pilot workload [2]. To ensure the safety of pilots and crew operating within the Helicopter Ship Dynamic Interface (HSDI), a series of launch and recovery tests are completed with the ship and helicopter at-sea for winds of different strength and direction to determine the Ship-Helicopter Operating Limits (SHOL). An example of a SHOL is shown in Figure 1 indicating the boundary outside of which the combination of wind over deck conditions (magnitude and direction) make it unsafe for the helicopter to land. Through the use of Modelling and Simulation (M&S), at-sea conditions can be recreated for a given ship and used for analysis of both the air flow in which the aircraft is operating, and for real-time piloted flight in a simulated environment [3]. This paper presents the development of individual elements required for flight simulation within the HSDI and the in-house tools developed to inspect the air flow prior to SHOL testing at-sea.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Unspecified)
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 25 Jul 2019 14:17
Last Modified: 09 Nov 2021 08:31
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3050319