When the going gets tough: the influence of expatriate resilience and perceived organizational inclusion climate on work adjustment and turnover intentions



Davies, Samuel E ORCID: 0000-0002-1831-4644, Stoermer, Sebastian and Froese, Fabian J
(2019) When the going gets tough: the influence of expatriate resilience and perceived organizational inclusion climate on work adjustment and turnover intentions. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 30 (8). 1393 - 1417.

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Abstract

Despite the strong evidence for the beneficial influence of resilience for employee stress resistance in domestic settings, the construct has not received much attention in the expatriation literature, where stress is considered a major factor for expatriates’ poor cross-cultural adjustment and turnover. Drawing upon conservation of resources theory, the present study examines resilience as an antecedent of expatriate work adjustment and turnover intentions. Furthermore, this study investigates the moderating role of perceived organizational inclusion climate as a resource-protecting organizational factor. Results from a survey of 175 expatriates in South Korea indicate that resilience is positively related to expatriate work adjustment and that these positive effects are more pronounced when expatriates perceive their organizational climate to be highly inclusive. Furthermore, findings suggest that work adjustment mediates the effects of resilience on turnover intentions and that this mediation is moderated by a perceived organizational inclusion climate. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Expatriates, resilience, perceived organizational inclusion climate, work adjustment, conservation of resources theory, South Korea
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 14 Oct 2019 07:25
Last Modified: 25 Oct 2021 14:10
DOI: 10.1080/09585192.2018.1528558
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3057953