The relationship between ingroup identity and Paranoid ideation among people from African and African Caribbean backgrounds



McIntyre, Jason C, Elahi, Anam, Barlow, Fiona Kate, White, Ross G ORCID: 0000-0003-4026-6439 and Bentall, Richard P
(2019) The relationship between ingroup identity and Paranoid ideation among people from African and African Caribbean backgrounds. PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHOTHERAPY-THEORY RESEARCH AND PRACTICE. 1 - 17.

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Abstract

Objectives People from ethnic minority groups experience higher rates of paranoid delusions compared with people from ethnic majority groups. Identifying with social groups has been shown to protect against mental health symptoms; however, no studies have investigated the relationship between social identification and paranoia in ethnic minority populations. Here, we investigated the association between British identification and paranoia in a sample of people from African and African Caribbean backgrounds living in the United Kingdom. We also assessed the role of potential mediating (self‐esteem and locus of control) and moderating (contact with White British people) factors. Design Cross‐sectional quantitative survey design. Methods We recruited 335 people from African and African Caribbean backgrounds who completed online self‐report measures of identification with Great Britain, self‐esteem, locus of control, positive and negative contact with White British people, and paranoia. Results A parallel moderated mediation model indicated that British identification was associated with lower paranoia when participants experienced primarily positive contact with White British people. British identification was associated with higher paranoia when participants had primarily negative contact with White British people. Both effects were mediated by changes in locus of control, but self‐esteem was not implicated in either pathway. Conclusions Identification with the majority culture is associated both positively and negatively with paranoid beliefs depending on the types of social interactions people experience. The findings have implications for preventative social prescribing initiatives and for understanding the causes of the high rates of psychosis in ethnic minority populations.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Paranoia, Psychosis, African, African Caribbean, social identity, intergroup contact, mental health, ethnic minority
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2019 09:58
Last Modified: 08 Apr 2021 14:11
DOI: 10.1111/papt.12261
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URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3065211