Isoniazid acetylation phenotypes in the Sudanese population; findings and implications.



Ali, Monadil H, Alrasheedy, Alian A, Kibuule, Dan ORCID: 0000-0002-6908-2177, Hassali, Mohamed Azmi, Godman, Brian, Abdelwahab, Mohammed F and Abbadi, Raef Y
(2019) Isoniazid acetylation phenotypes in the Sudanese population; findings and implications. Journal of clinical tuberculosis and other mycobacterial diseases, 17. 100120 - ?.

[img] Text
Ali et al - accepted for publication.docx - Accepted Version

Download (295kB)

Abstract

Background:Isoniazid (INH) is the mainstay antimicrobial in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). It is acetlylated in the liver to acetyl-INH. However, there is variation in rate of acetylation of INH among TB patients (i.e. fast, intermediate or slow acetylators) which impacts on the treatment outcomes. Aim:The isoniazid acetylation phenotypes in the expatriate Sudanese population were determined to provide future guidance since TB is prevalent in Sudan. Methods:A community-based trial among Sudanese expatriates in Saudi Arabia was undertaken to identify INH-acetylation phenotypes. After overnight fasting, a single dose of 200 mg of INH was given to the volunteers. Three hours later, 5 ml of blood were drawn from each volunteer and prepared for High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis. The main outcomes were INH and Acetyl-INH concentrations in plasma and the subsequent Acetyl-INH/INH metabolic ratio (MR). Results:The findings suggest that slow acetylation is highly prevalent among the study participants (n = 43; 84.31%). Moreover, there was no statistically significant correlation between age and the MR (r = -0.18, P = 0.20). Further, there was no significant association between gender and the MR (P = 0.124). Similarly, no significant association was found between smoking habits and MR (P = 0.24). Conclusion:Isoniazid phenotyping suggests predominantly slow acetylation among the Sudanese in this sample. The study found no statistically significant associations between the MR and age or gender or smoking.

Item Type: Article
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 10 Dec 2019 09:06
Last Modified: 19 Nov 2020 01:10
DOI: 10.1016/j.jctube.2019.100120
URI: http://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3065667