Predicting On-axis Rotorcraft Dynamic Responses Using Machine Learning Techniques



Jackson, Ryan D ORCID: 0000-0002-4930-0480, Jump, Michael ORCID: 0000-0002-1028-2334 and Green, Peter L
(2020) Predicting On-axis Rotorcraft Dynamic Responses Using Machine Learning Techniques. Journal of the American Helicopter Society, 65 (3). 1 - 12.

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Abstract

Physical-law-based models are widely utilized in the aerospace industry. One such use is to provide flight dynamics models for use in flight simulators. For human-in-the-loop use, such simulators must run in real-time. Owing to the complex physics of rotorcraft flight, to meet this real-time requirement, simplifications to the underlying physics sometimes have to be applied to the model, leading to errors in the model's predictions of the real vehicle's response. This study investigated whether a machine-learning technique could be employed to provide rotorcraft dynamic response predictions. Machine learning was facilitated using a Gaussian process (GP) nonlinear autoregressive model, which predicted the on-axis pitch rate, roll rate, yaw rate, and heave responses of a Bo105 rotorcraft. A variational sparse GP model was then developed to reduce the computational cost of implementing the approach on large datasets. It was found that both of the GP models were able to provide accurate on-axis response predictions, particularly when the model input contained all four control inceptors and one lagged on-axis response term. The predictions made showed improvement compared to a corresponding physics-based model. The reduction of training data to one-third (rotational axes) or one-half (heave axis) resulted in only minor degradation of the sparse GP model predictions. response predictions. Machine learning was facilitated using a Gaussian process (GP) nonlinear autoregressive model, which predicted the on-axis pitch rate, roll rate, yaw rate, and heave responses of a Bo105 rotorcraft. A variational sparse GP model was then developed to reduce the computational cost of implementing the approach on large datasets. It was found that both of the GP models were able to provide accurate on-axis response predictions, particularly when the model input contained all four control inceptors and one lagged on-axis response term. The predictions made showed improvement compared to a corresponding physics-based model. The reduction of training data to one-third (rotational axes) or one-half (heave axis) resulted in only minor degradation of the sparse GP model predictions.</jats:p>

Item Type: Article
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 16 Jul 2020 07:35
Last Modified: 09 Nov 2021 13:36
DOI: 10.4050/jahs.65.032004
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3094109