Pathology, infectious agents and horse- and management-level risk factors associated with signs of respiratory disease in Ethiopian working horses.



Laing, G, Christley, R ORCID: 0000-0001-9250-3032, Stringer, A, Ashine, T, Cian, F, Aklilu, N, Newton, R, Radford, A ORCID: 0000-0002-4590-1334 and Pinchbeck, G ORCID: 0000-0002-5671-8623
(2020) Pathology, infectious agents and horse- and management-level risk factors associated with signs of respiratory disease in Ethiopian working horses. Equine Veterinary Journal.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND:Respiratory disease is a common cause for presentation of working horses to clinics in Ethiopia and a priority concern for owners. OBJECTIVES:Identify risk factors for and association of pathogens with respiratory signs in working horses. Study design Unmatched case-control study. METHODS:Cases were those animals recently coughing (last 7 days) or observed with coughing, nasal discharge or altered respiration at the time of examination. A physical exam and respiratory endoscopy were performed including a tracheal wash sample to detect the presence of pathogens and serology performed on blood. An owner questionnaire was administered. Risk factors were determined using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS:Data on 108 cases and 93 unmatched control horses were obtained. Case horses often had underlying lower airway pathology and were significantly more likely to have S zooepidemicus detected (OR 12.4, 95% CI 3.6-42.4). There was no evidence of a major role for viral respiratory pathogens. Risk factors included completion of strenuous work (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2-6.3), drinking from stagnant water sources (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.0-5.2) or being housed on a cobbled floor (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.8). There were increased odds of respiratory disease in young and old horses in this population. Main limitations Samples for pathogen detection and cytology were only taken from the trachea. CONCLUSION:S zooepidemicus, a common commensal, may play a role in clinical respiratory disease in this population.

Item Type: Article
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 07 Oct 2020 10:11
Last Modified: 06 May 2021 02:11
DOI: 10.1111/evj.13339
Open Access URL: http://doi.org/10.1111/evj.13339
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3103827