Effectiveness of the fetal pillow to prevent adverse maternal and fetal outcomes at full dilatation cesarean section in routine practice.



Sacre, Helen, Bird, Alice, Clement-Jones, Mark and Sharp, Andrew ORCID: 0000-0003-3396-7464
(2020) Effectiveness of the fetal pillow to prevent adverse maternal and fetal outcomes at full dilatation cesarean section in routine practice. Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica.

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION:The fetal pillow has been suggested to reduce maternal trauma and fetal adverse outcomes when used to disimpact the fetal head at full dilatation cesarean section. MATERIAL AND METHODS:We performed a retrospective cohort study of the use of the fetal pillow device at full dilatation cesarean section between September 2014 and March 2018 at Liverpool Women's Hospital, a large UK teaching hospital. RESULTS:There were 471 cases of full dilatation cesarean section during the study period and 391 were included for the analysis; 170 used the fetal pillow and 221 cases were delivered without. We did not demonstrate any benefit in the significant maternal outcomes of; estimated blood loss >1000ml or >1500ml, need for blood transfusion or duration of hospital stay, from the use of the fetal pillow. We did not demonstrate any improvement in fetal outcome following use of the fetal pillow; arterial pH <7.1, apgar score <7 at 5 mins or admission to the neonatal unit. For deliveries undertaken at or below the level of the ischial spines there was likewise no benefit from fetal pillow use except in a reduced risk of an arterial pH <7.1 (0.39 (0.20 - 0.80), 0.0094) however admission to the neonatal unit was unaffected. CONCLUSIONS:This is the largest study to date on the use of the fetal pillow at full dilatation cesarean section. We did not demonstrate any statistically significant benefit from the use of the fetal pillow to prevent any of maternal or fetal adverse outcomes at full dilatation cesarean section in routine clinical use. Further randomised studies are required to prove clinical benefit from this device prior to more widespread use.

Item Type: Article
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 19 Nov 2020 08:55
Last Modified: 06 Dec 2021 05:10
DOI: 10.1111/aogs.14038
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3107496