Evaluating environmental impact assessment (EIA) in the countries along the belt and road initiatives: System effectiveness and the compatibility with the Chinese EIA



Aung, Thiri Shwesin, Fischer, Thomas B ORCID: 0000-0003-1436-1221 and Shengji, Luan
(2020) Evaluating environmental impact assessment (EIA) in the countries along the belt and road initiatives: System effectiveness and the compatibility with the Chinese EIA. Environmental Impact Assessment Review, 81. p. 106361.

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Abstract

BRI has a great potential to improve necessary infrastructure, regional development, connectivity, and industrialization, and promote the sustainable transformation of the countries along the routes. Despite the remarkable aims, economic growth ambition of BRI may clash with the sustainability of the ecosystem given the scales of operations in environmentally sensitive regions, and the amount of material and energy needed. Therefore, the sustainable potential and environmental stewardship of the BRI will largely depend on the standard of strategic environmental and social management, and integration between China and partner countries of respective priorities, policies, and regulations. The effectiveness and compatibility of environmental impact assessment systems (EIA) remain largely unknown, especially across the diverse ecological, social, economic and political contexts represented in countries along the BRI. We review and compare EIA systems on the contextual factors that moderate the effectiveness and compatibility with China's policy. This work helps to identify strategies to more efficiently and effectively implement BRI towards sustainable development.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: BRI, Environmental impact assessment, China, Sustainability
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 09 Mar 2021 10:43
Last Modified: 18 Jan 2023 22:57
DOI: 10.1016/j.eiar.2019.106361
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3116831