Genetic comorbidity between major depression and cardio‐metabolic traits, stratified by age at onset of major depression



Hagenaars, Saskia P, Coleman, Jonathan RI, Choi, Shing Wan, Gaspar, Helena, Adams, Mark J, Howard, David M, Hodgson, Karen, Traylor, Matthew, Air, Tracy M, Andlauer, Till FM
et al (show 38 more authors) (2020) Genetic comorbidity between major depression and cardio‐metabolic traits, stratified by age at onset of major depression. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 183 (6). 309 - 330.

Access the full-text of this item by clicking on the Open Access link.

Abstract

It is imperative to understand the specific and shared etiologies of major depression and cardio‐metabolic disease, as both traits are frequently comorbid and each represents a major burden to society. This study examined whether there is a genetic association between major depression and cardio‐metabolic traits and if this association is stratified by age at onset for major depression. Polygenic risk scores analysis and linkage disequilibrium score regression was performed to examine whether differences in shared genetic etiology exist between depression case control status (N cases = 40,940, N controls = 67,532), earlier (N = 15,844), and later onset depression (N = 15,800) with body mass index, coronary artery disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes in 11 data sets from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, Generation Scotland, and UK Biobank. All cardio‐metabolic polygenic risk scores were associated with depression status. Significant genetic correlations were found between depression and body mass index, coronary artery disease, and type 2 diabetes. Higher polygenic risk for body mass index, coronary artery disease, and type 2 diabetes was associated with both early and later onset depression, while higher polygenic risk for stroke was associated with later onset depression only. Significant genetic correlations were found between body mass index and later onset depression, and between coronary artery disease and both early and late onset depression. The phenotypic associations between major depression and cardio‐metabolic traits may partly reflect their overlapping genetic etiology irrespective of the age depression first presents.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: age at onset, cardio-metabolic disease, depression, genetics, polygenic risk scores
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Life Sciences
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences > Institute of Population Health
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 22 Jul 2021 08:31
Last Modified: 15 Oct 2021 21:10
DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.b.32807
Open Access URL: https://doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.b.32807
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3130930