Clinical Review of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in the Context of COVID-19 Vaccinations: Evaluation, Management, and Scientific Questions



Thakur, Kiran, Tamborska, Arina, Wood, Greta, McNeill, Emily, Roh, David, Akpan, Imo, Miller, Eliza, Bautista, Alyssa, Claassen, Jan, Kim, Carla
et al (show 11 more authors) (2021) Clinical Review of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in the Context of COVID-19 Vaccinations: Evaluation, Management, and Scientific Questions.

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Abstract

Background: Vaccine induced immune medicated thrombocytopenia or VITT, is a recent and rare phenomenon of thrombosis with thrombocytopenia, frequently including cerebral venous thromboses (CVT), that has been described following vaccination with adenovirus vaccines ChAdOx1 nCOV-19 (AstraZeneca) and Ad26.COV2.S Johnson and Johnson (Janssen/J&J). The evaluation and management of suspected cases of CVT post COVID-19 vaccination are critical skills for a broad range of healthcare providers. <br><br>Methods: A collaborative comprehensive review of literature was conducted among a global group of expert neurologists and hematologists. <br><br>Findings: Strategies for rapid evaluation and treatment of the CVT in the context of possible VITT exist, including inflammatory marker measurements, PF4 assays, and non-heparin anticoagulation. <br><br>Interpretation: There are many unanswered questions regarding cases of CVT, possibly in association with VITT. Public health specialists should explore ways to enhance public and professional education, surveillance, and reporting of this syndrome to reduce its impact on health and global vaccination efforts. <br><br>Funding: None

Item Type: Article
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Life Sciences
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Sciences
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 23 Aug 2021 09:02
Last Modified: 05 May 2022 21:11
DOI: 10.2139/ssrn.3844148
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3134442