Long Covid in adults discharged from UK hospitals after Covid-19: A prospective, multicentre cohort study using the ISARIC WHO Clinical Characterisation Protocol.



Sigfrid, Louise ORCID: 0000-0003-2764-1177, Drake, Thomas M, Pauley, Ellen, Jesudason, Edwin C, Olliaro, Piero, Lim, Wei Shen, Gillesen, Annelies, Berry, Colin, Lowe, David J, McPeake, Joanne
et al (show 27 more authors) (2021) Long Covid in adults discharged from UK hospitals after Covid-19: A prospective, multicentre cohort study using the ISARIC WHO Clinical Characterisation Protocol. The Lancet regional health. Europe, 8. 100186 - ?.

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Abstract

<h4>Background</h4>This study sought to establish the long-term effects of Covid-19 following hospitalisation.<h4>Methods</h4>327 hospitalised participants, with SARS-CoV-2 infection were recruited into a prospective multicentre cohort study at least 3 months post-discharge. The primary outcome was self-reported recovery at least ninety days after initial Covid-19 symptom onset. Secondary outcomes included new symptoms, disability (Washington group short scale), breathlessness (MRC Dyspnoea scale) and quality of life (EQ5D-5L).<h4>Findings</h4>55% of participants reported not feeling fully recovered. 93% reported persistent symptoms, with fatigue the most common (83%), followed by breathlessness (54%). 47% reported an increase in MRC dyspnoea scale of at least one grade. New or worse disability was reported by 24% of participants. The EQ5D-5L summary index was significantly worse following acute illness (median difference 0.1 points on a scale of 0 to 1, IQR: -0.2 to 0.0). Females under the age of 50 years were five times less likely to report feeling recovered (adjusted OR 5.09, 95% CI 1.64 to 15.74), were more likely to have greater disability (adjusted OR 4.22, 95% CI 1.12 to 15.94), twice as likely to report worse fatigue (adjusted OR 2.06, 95% CI 0.81 to 3.31) and seven times more likely to become more breathless (adjusted OR 7.15, 95% CI 2.24 to 22.83) than men of the same age.<h4>Interpretation</h4>Survivors of Covid-19 experienced long-term symptoms, new disability, increased breathlessness, and reduced quality of life. These findings were present in young, previously healthy working age adults, and were most common in younger females.<h4>Funding</h4>National Institute for Health Research, UK Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, Department for International Development and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: ISARIC4C investigators
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Life Sciences
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Sciences
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 30 Sep 2021 07:57
Last Modified: 04 Sep 2022 11:42
DOI: 10.1016/j.lanepe.2021.100186
Open Access URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lanepe.2021.100186
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3138719