The interaction of Helicobacter pylori with cancer immunomodulatory stromal cells: New insight into gastric cancer pathogenesis.



Navashenaq, Jamshid Gholizadeh, Shabgah, Arezoo Gowhari, Banach, Maciej ORCID: 0000-0001-6690-6874, Jamialahmadi, Tannaz, Penson, Peter E, Johnston, Thomas P and Sahebkar, Amirhossein
(2021) The interaction of Helicobacter pylori with cancer immunomodulatory stromal cells: New insight into gastric cancer pathogenesis. Seminars in cancer biology. S1044-579X(21)00248-0 - ?.

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Abstract

Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-linked deaths in the world. Gastric tumor cells have biological characteristics such as rapid proliferation, high invasiveness, and drug resistance, which result in recurrence and poor survival. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been proposed as a first-class carcinogen for gastric cancer according to the 1994 world health organization (WHO) classification. One of the important mechanisms by which H. pylori affects the gastric environment and promotes carcinogenesis is triggering inflammation. H. pylori induces an inflammatory response and a plethora of different signal transduction processes, leading to gastric mucosal disturbance, chronic gastritis, and a multi-step complex pathway that initiates carcinogenesis. It seems undeniable that the interaction between various cell types, including immune cells, gastric epithelium, glands, and stem cells, is vital for the progression and development of carcinogenesis concerning H. pylori. The interactions of H. pylori with surrounding cells play a key role in cancer progression. In this review, we discuss the interplay between H. pylori and tumor-supportive cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and myeloid derived-suppressor cells (MDSCs) in gastric cancer. It is hoped that clarifying the specific mechanisms for 'cross-talk' between H. pylori and these cells will provide promising strategies for developing new treatments.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Life Sciences
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences > Institute of Life Courses and Medical Sciences
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 21 Dec 2021 15:50
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2022 12:03
DOI: 10.1016/j.semcancer.2021.09.014
Open Access URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.semcancer.2021.09.014
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3145807