Making the connections: physical and electric interactions in biohybrid photosynthetic systems



Yang, Ying, Liu, Lu-Ning, Tian, Haining, Cooper, Andrew I and Sprick, Reiner Sebastian
(2023) Making the connections: physical and electric interactions in biohybrid photosynthetic systems. ENERGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE, 16 (10). pp. 4305-4319.

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Abstract

Biohybrid photosynthesis systems, which combine biological and non-biological materials, have attracted recent interest in solar-to-chemical energy conversion. However, the solar efficiencies of such systems remain low, despite advances in both artificial photosynthesis and synthetic biology. Here we discuss the potential of conjugated organic materials as photosensitisers for biological hybrid systems compared to traditional inorganic semiconductors. Organic materials offer the ability to tune both photophysical properties and the specific physicochemical interactions between the photosensitiser and biological cells, thus improving stability and charge transfer. We highlight the state-of-the-art and opportunities for new approaches in designing new biohybrid systems. This perspective also summarises the current understanding of the underlying electron transport process and highlights the research areas that need to be pursued to underpin the development of hybrid photosynthesis systems.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 40 Engineering, 3403 Macromolecular and Materials Chemistry, 4016 Materials Engineering, 34 Chemical Sciences, Biotechnology, 7 Affordable and Clean Energy
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science and Engineering > School of Physical Sciences
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences > Institute of Systems, Molecular and Integrative Biology
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 29 Sep 2023 15:42
Last Modified: 21 Jun 2024 00:50
DOI: 10.1039/d3ee01265d
Open Access URL: https://doi.org/10.1039/D3EE01265D
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3173241