Development of a pseudo-typed virus particle based method to determine the efficacy of virucidal agents.



Thomas, Jordan, Mughal, Farah, Roper, Kelly J, Kotsiri, Aurelia, Albalawi, Wejdan, Alshehri, Abdullateef, Reddy, Yugandhar BS, Mukherjee, Sayandip, Pollakis, Georgios ORCID: 0000-0002-9659-5461, Paxton, William A ORCID: 0000-0001-5200-0801
et al (show 1 more authors) (2024) Development of a pseudo-typed virus particle based method to determine the efficacy of virucidal agents. Scientific reports, 14 (1). 2174-.

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Abstract

The ongoing Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has highlighted the threat that viral outbreaks pose to global health. A key tool in the arsenal to prevent and control viral disease outbreaks is disinfection of equipment and surfaces with formulations that contain virucidal agents (VA). However, assessment of the efficacy of virus inactivation often requires live virus assays or surrogate viruses such as Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA), which can be expensive, time consuming and technically challenging. Therefore, we have developed a pseudo-typed virus (PV) based approach to assess the inactivation of enveloped viruses with a fast and quantitative output that can be adapted to emerging viruses. Additionally, we have developed a method to completely remove the cytotoxicity of virucidal agents while retaining the required sensitivity to measure PV infectivity. Our results indicated that the removal of cytotoxicity was an essential step to accurately measure virus inactivation. Further, we demonstrated that there was no difference in susceptibility to virus inactivation between PVs that express the envelopes of HIV-1, SARS-CoV-2, and Influenza A/Indonesia. Therefore, we have developed an effective and safe alternative to live virus assays that enables the rapid assessment of virucidal activity for the development and optimization of virucidal reagents.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Humans, Viruses, Virion, Virus Diseases, Disinfection, Influenza, Human
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Life Sciences
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Sciences
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 24 Jan 2024 09:18
Last Modified: 02 Feb 2024 16:44
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-024-52177-2
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3177965