Shared Identity and the End of Conflict? How Far Has a Common Sense of 'Northern Irishness' Replaced British or Irish Allegiances since the 1998 Good Friday Agreement?



Tonge, Jonathan ORCID: 0000-0002-4350-9101 and Gomez, Raul
(2015) Shared Identity and the End of Conflict? How Far Has a Common Sense of 'Northern Irishness' Replaced British or Irish Allegiances since the 1998 Good Friday Agreement? IRISH POLITICAL STUDIES, 30 (2). pp. 276-298.

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Abstract

Despite political progress in Northern Ireland, the polity may arguably only fully stabilise when its population regards themselves as Northern Irish rather than merely as subsets of British and Irish parent nations. Power-sharing and relative peace since the 1998 Good Friday Agreement may have offered the possibility of the development of a common Northern Irish identity, to allow consolidation of a political entity challenged by sections of the nationalist minority since its formation in 1921. Alternatively, the consociational nature of the Agreement may have legitimised separate but equal identity politics constructed on the British versus Irish faultline. This articles tests whether there has been a significant growth of cross-community Northern Irishness since the Agreement, capable of eroding inter-communal rivalry.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 4408 Political Science, 44 Human Society, 16 Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 12 Apr 2016 14:19
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2024 23:49
DOI: 10.1080/07907184.2015.1023716
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3000245