Non-islet-cell tumour hypoglycaemia in a cat with hepatocellular carcinoma.



Guillen, Alexandra, Ressel, Lorenzo ORCID: 0000-0002-6614-1223, Finotello, Riccardo ORCID: 0000-0002-1932-211X, German, Alexander J ORCID: 0000-0002-3017-7988, Freeman, Alistair and Blackwood, Laura
(2019) Non-islet-cell tumour hypoglycaemia in a cat with hepatocellular carcinoma. JFMS open reports, 5 (1). p. 2055116919856129.

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Abstract

An 11-year-old male neutered domestic shorthair cat presented with behavioural changes. Physical examination revealed bradycardia and a cranial abdominal mass. The cat was persistently hypoglycaemic (1.2 mmol/l; reference interval [RI] 3.5-5.5 mmol/l) with decreased fructosamine concentration suggesting chronic hypoglycaemia, and decreased insulin concentration excluding insulinoma. Alanine aminotransferase activity was markedly increased (1219.31 U/l; RI 15-60 U/l). On staging CT a large, multilobulated hepatic mass was identified, with no evidence of metastatic disease. After surgical removal serum glucose concentration and heart rate quickly returned to within the RIs. Histopathology was consistent with a solid-to-trabecular, well-differentiated, hepatocellular carcinoma. There was no recurrence of signs or mass during 8 months of follow-up, and the cat was still alive 20 months after surgery. Non-islet-cell tumour hypoglycaemia (NICTH) is a rare but life-threatening paraneoplastic syndrome. In humans, hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common epithelial tumour causing NICTH, but these are uncommon in cats, and associated paraneoplastic hypoglycaemia has not been reported. Possible mechanisms include aberrant secretion of big insulin growth factor 2; however, this could not be confirmed. NICTH should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cats with persistent hypoglycaemia.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: HCC, IGF-2, hepatocellular carcinoma, hypoglycaemia, insulin growth factor 2, paraneoplastic
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 06 Jan 2020 09:11
Last Modified: 19 Jan 2023 00:24
DOI: 10.1177/2055116919856129
Open Access URL: https://doi.org/10.1177/2055116919856129
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URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3057317

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