How do early-life adverse childhood experiences mediate the relationship between childhood socioeconomic conditions and adolescent health outcomes in the UK?



Straatmann, Viviane S, Lai, Eric, Law, Catherine, Whitehead, Margaret ORCID: 0000-0001-5614-6576, Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine and Taylor-Robinson, David ORCID: 0000-0002-5828-7724
(2020) How do early-life adverse childhood experiences mediate the relationship between childhood socioeconomic conditions and adolescent health outcomes in the UK? Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 74 (11). pp. 969-975.

This is the latest version of this item.

Access the full-text of this item by clicking on the Open Access link.
[thumbnail of jech-2020-213817.full.pdf] Text
jech-2020-213817.full.pdf - Published version

Download (321kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background Both adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and adverse childhood socioeconomic conditions (SECs) in early life are associated with poor outcomes across the life course. However, the complex interrelationships between childhood SECs and ACEs are unclear, as are the consequences for health outcomes beyond childhood. We therefore assessed the extent to which early-life ACEs mediate the relationship between SECs and socioemotional behavioural problems, cognitive disability and overweight/obesity in adolescence. Methods We used longitudinal data from the UK Millennium Cohort Study (MSC). Outcomes assessed at age 14 were socioemotional behavioural problems, cognitive disability and overweight/obesity. SECs at birth were measured by maternal education. Potentially mediating ACEs measured up to 5 years were verbal and physical maltreatment, parental drug use, domestic violence, parental divorce, maternal mental illness and high frequency of parental alcohol use. We used counterfactual mediation analysis to assess the extent to which ACEs mediate the association between SECs at birth and behavioural, cognitive and physical outcomes at age 14, estimating total (TE), natural direct and indirect effects, and mediated proportions. Results Children with disadvantaged SECs were more likely to have socioemotional behavioural problems (relative risk (RR) 3.85, 95% CI 2.48 to 5.97), cognitive disability (RR 3.87, 95% CI 2.33 to 6.43) and overweight/obesity (RR 1.61, 95% CI 1.32 to 1.95), compared to those with more advantaged SECs. Overall, 18% of the TE of SECs on socioemotional behavioural problems was mediated through all ACEs investigated. For cognitive disability and overweight/obese, the proportions mediated were 13% and 19%, respectively. Conclusion ACEs measured up to age 5 years in the MCS explained about one-sixth of inequalities in adolescents behavioural, cognitive and physical outcomes.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Health inequalities, cohort studies, child health, public health
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 17 Sep 2020 10:07
Last Modified: 18 Jan 2023 23:32
DOI: 10.1136/jech-2020-213817
Open Access URL: https://jech.bmj.com/content/jech/early/2020/08/26...
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3101541

Available Versions of this Item