Synthesis and biological evaluation of pentacyclic triterpenoid derivatives as potential novel antibacterial agents



Wu, Panpan, Tu, Borong, Liang, Jinfeng, Guo, Shengzhu, Cao, Nana, Chen, Silin, Luo, Zhujun, Li, Jiahao, Zheng, Wende, Tang, Xiaowen
et al (show 8 more authors) (2021) Synthesis and biological evaluation of pentacyclic triterpenoid derivatives as potential novel antibacterial agents. BIOORGANIC CHEMISTRY, 109. 104692-.

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Abstract

A series of ursolic acid (UA), oleanolic acid (OA) and 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) derivatives were synthesized by introducing a range of substituted aromatic side-chains at the C-2 position after the hydroxyl group at C-3 position was oxidized. Their antibacterial activities were evaluated in vitro against a panel of four Staphylococcus spp. The results revealed that the introduction of aromatic side-chains at the C-2 position of GA led to the discovery of potent triterpenoid derivatives for inhibition of both drug sensitive and resistant S. aureus, while the other two series derivatives of UA and OA showed no significant antibacterial activity even at high concentrations. In particular, GA derivative 33 showed good potency against all four Staphylococcus spp. (MIC = 1.25-5 μmol/L) with acceptable pharmacokinetics properties and low cytotoxicity in vitro. Molecular docking was also performed using S. aureus DNA gyrase to rationalize the observed antibacterial activity. This series of GA derivatives has strong potential for the development of a new type of triterpenoid antibacterial agent.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Pentacyclic triterpenes, Natural product derivatives, Gram-positive bacteria, Antibacterial, 18?-glycyrrhetinic acid
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 09 Mar 2021 14:33
Last Modified: 18 Jan 2023 22:57
DOI: 10.1016/j.bioorg.2021.104692
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3116843