Impact of maternal antibodies and microbiota development on the immunogenicity of oral rotavirus vaccine in African, Indian, and European infants



Parker, Edward PK, Bronowski, Christina ORCID: 0000-0001-8089-4021, Sindhu, Kulandaipalayam Natarajan C, Babji, Sudhir, Benny, Blossom, Carmona-Vicente, Noelia, Chasweka, Nedson, Chinyama, End, Cunliffe, Nigel A ORCID: 0000-0002-5449-4988, Dube, Queen
et al (show 19 more authors) (2021) Impact of maternal antibodies and microbiota development on the immunogenicity of oral rotavirus vaccine in African, Indian, and European infants. NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 12 (1). 7288-.

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Abstract

Identifying risk factors for impaired oral rotavirus vaccine (ORV) efficacy in low-income countries may lead to improvements in vaccine design and delivery. In this prospective cohort study, we measure maternal rotavirus antibodies, environmental enteric dysfunction (EED), and bacterial gut microbiota development among infants receiving two doses of Rotarix in India (n = 307), Malawi (n = 119), and the UK (n = 60), using standardised methods across cohorts. We observe ORV shedding and seroconversion rates to be significantly lower in Malawi and India than the UK. Maternal rotavirus-specific antibodies in serum and breastmilk are negatively correlated with ORV response in India and Malawi, mediated partly by a reduction in ORV shedding. In the UK, ORV shedding is not inhibited despite comparable maternal antibody levels to the other cohorts. In both India and Malawi, increased microbiota diversity is negatively correlated with ORV immunogenicity, suggesting that high early-life microbial exposure may contribute to impaired vaccine efficacy.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Milk, Human, Humans, Rotavirus, Rotavirus Infections, Infant, Newborn, Diseases, Immunoglobulin A, Vaccines, Attenuated, Rotavirus Vaccines, Antibodies, Viral, Prospective Studies, Virus Shedding, Immunity, Maternally-Acquired, Pregnancy, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Malawi, India, Female, Male, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, United Kingdom, Vaccine Efficacy
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Life Sciences
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Sciences
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences > Institute of Life Courses and Medical Sciences
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 26 Jan 2022 11:34
Last Modified: 18 Jan 2023 21:14
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-021-27074-1
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3147624