Prevalent occupational exposures and risk of lung cancer among women: Results from the application of the Canadian Job-Exposure Matrix (CANJEM) to a combined set of ten case-control studies.



Xu, Mengting ORCID: 0000-0002-6751-1986, Ho, Vikki, Lavoué, Jérôme, Olsson, Ann, Schüz, Joachim ORCID: 0000-0001-9687-2134, Richardson, Lesley, Parent, Marie-Elise, McLaughlin, John R, Demers, Paul A, Guénel, Pascal ORCID: 0000-0002-8359-518X
et al (show 13 more authors) (2024) Prevalent occupational exposures and risk of lung cancer among women: Results from the application of the Canadian Job-Exposure Matrix (CANJEM) to a combined set of ten case-control studies. American journal of industrial medicine, 67 (3). pp. 200-213.

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Abstract

<h4>Background</h4>Worldwide, lung cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women. The present study explored associations between occupational exposures that are prevalent among women, and lung cancer.<h4>Methods</h4>Data from 10 case-control studies of lung cancer from Europe, Canada, and New Zealand conducted between 1988 and 2008 were combined. Lifetime occupational history and information on nonoccupational factors including smoking were available for 3040 incident lung cancer cases and 4187 controls. We linked each reported job to the Canadian Job-Exposure Matrix (CANJEM), which provided estimates of probability, intensity, and frequency of exposure to each selected agent in each job. For this analysis, we selected 15 agents (cleaning agents, biocides, cotton dust, synthetic fibers, formaldehyde, cooking fumes, organic solvents, cellulose, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from petroleum, ammonia, metallic dust, alkanes C18+, iron compounds, isopropanol, and calcium carbonate) that had lifetime exposure prevalence of at least 5% in the combined study population. For each agent, we estimated lung cancer risk in each study center for ever-exposure, by duration of exposure, and by cumulative exposure, using separate logistic regression models adjusted for smoking and other covariates. We then estimated the meta-odds ratios using random-effects meta-analysis.<h4>Results and conclusions</h4>None of the agents assessed showed consistent and compelling associations with lung cancer among women. The following agents showed elevated odds ratio in some analyses: metallic dust, iron compounds, isopropanol, and organic solvents. Future research into occupational lung cancer risk factors among women should prioritize these agents.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Occupational Diseases, Iron Compounds, 2-Propanol, Dust, Solvents, Risk Factors, Case-Control Studies, Occupational Exposure, Canada, Female
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Life Sciences
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences > Institute of Systems, Molecular and Integrative Biology
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 22 Jan 2024 17:11
Last Modified: 01 Mar 2024 18:48
DOI: 10.1002/ajim.23562
Open Access URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajim.2...
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3177957