Unhealthy Food and Beverage Marketing to Children in the Digital Age: Global Research and Policy Challenges and Priorities.



Boyland, Emma, Backholer, Kathryn, Potvin Kent, Monique, Bragg, Marie A, Sing, Fiona, Karupaiah, Tilakavati and Kelly, Bridget
(2024) Unhealthy Food and Beverage Marketing to Children in the Digital Age: Global Research and Policy Challenges and Priorities. Annual review of nutrition.

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Abstract

Food and nonalcoholic beverage marketing is implicated in poor diet and obesity in children. The rapid growth and proliferation of digital marketing has resulted in dramatic changes to advertising practices and children's exposure. The constantly evolving and data-driven nature of digital food marketing presents substantial challenges for researchers seeking to quantify the impact on children and for policymakers tasked with designing and implementing restrictive policies. We outline the latest evidence on children's experience of the contemporary digital food marketing ecosystem, conceptual frameworks guiding digital food marketing research, the impact of digital food marketing on dietary outcomes, and the methods used to determine impact, and we consider the key research and policy challenges and priorities for the field. Recent methodological and policy developments represent opportunities to apply novel and innovative solutions to address this complex issue, which could drive meaningful improvements in children's dietary health.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 32 Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, 3210 Nutrition and Dietetics, Pediatric, Obesity, Nutrition
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Life Sciences
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences > Institute of Population Health
Depositing User: Symplectic Admin
Date Deposited: 02 May 2024 10:27
Last Modified: 14 Jun 2024 16:29
DOI: 10.1146/annurev-nutr-062322-014102
Related URLs:
URI: https://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/id/eprint/3180735